Why did the original v*** end?

I know its common sense why it ended. But was the actuall reason confirmed anywhere? I know i read something about it on here. If somebody has link confirmed by actual creators of vine comment it here please :relieved::relieved::relieved:

You should red this:


In my opinion it was getting boring seeing the same 20 people on my timeline and every category all the time.

Because the popular people on the app thought they deserved to be paid to stay on the app just to make 6 seconds worth of content, then moved to YT or Instagram when they couldn’t get what they want. Also because of the same people getting on the popular page, the same content being posted over, over and over. Lol

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Thanks! I was searching for this and couldn’t find it. I didnt use the term “dead” so it didnt pop up

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Yeah no. Vine died because it was not profitable. Not because users wanted monetization. How would users wanting to be paid have he app shut down? That doesn’t make a bit of sense.

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You are right about Vine’s profitability, but there was also this…

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That’s a lot different than “Vine died because viners wanted to be paid.”

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It was one of the reasons, not the only reason.

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Vine was on its way out. People like Amanda Cerny and Logan Paul making 12 vines a month wasn’t going to save it. It’s laughable that they thought their content was worth 1 million.

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people just started to slowly stop using it so twitter said ohhhhhh heyyy naaaaaa to da na na na naaaaaaa heeyyyyyy naaaaaaa to da na na na

and shut it down

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I got told that twitter brought vine and then they couldn’t handle it so they deleted it

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oh and we dont say v*ne here

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twitter owned vine for a long time befor hand in October 2012 then shut it down in Jan, 17,17

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So anyone know if v2 will have adsense or something familiar?

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as far as i know it will

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After 9 straight quarters of slowing revenue growth, Twitter’s decision to layoff 9% of their workforce and shutdown Vine was made during their 2016 Q3 earnings call, in an attempt to pull their stock out of a very lengthy freefall.

Twitter reportedly saved $100 million a year with this move.

The decision was money motivated, nothing more.

From the NY Times Article on Vine’s Death:

In the end, Vine proved too expensive to keep running. The app was costing about $10 million a month for infrastructure and employees, according to two former employees. When Twitter began to take stock of its business and decide which assets to trim down, the Vine was at the top of the list.

Twitter did not care about our artistry, our careers, or the sense of familial connection we all formed through Vine. They only cared about the money, which is ironic, since they are godawful at making a profit…

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