Whats your workflow (from idea to posting)

Follwing on from @Jeridiculous post about how everyone films their bytes, I thought it would be interesting to see what everyone’s workflow is? Like from initial idea to posting the byte. Hopefully there could be some good tips unearthed.

So usually any idea I get goes straight into my notes (google keep) I colour code them so I know it’s a byte idea. I usually try and let the idea cook for a while, i’ve found that if i do one too quickly I usually think of a better delivery/punchline/camera angle etc. Once i’m ready to film I try and find somewhere with a decent light source, then push through all the self loathing and cringing at myself until i have something i don’t hate!

Once i’ve shot the footage i’ll share the clips of the good takes to a footage folder on my google drive and then transfer that to a byte folder and give it it’s own sub folder for footage and other assets like music, graphics or voiceovers. Then i start cutting it together and usually play around with it a bit until i’m happy with the cuts, timing and takes etc.

I export it, add it to a google drive folder for finished bytes and then upload from my phone when i’m ready to post.

I mainly use google drive as a bridge between my phone and my laptop but the free allowance is filling up quite quickly so thinking i might archive a lot of stuff onto an external drive soon.

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For me I take 30 minutes every day to come up with byte ideas. Once I have come up with some that I like, later that day i will film a couple. Then when it comes to posting I usually post them the next day to know I got it how I want it. That’s about as simple as it is for me.

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Mine will be different from most.

I get an idea. Sometimes I write it down. I paint it, scan and photograph it, upload and transfer it to my phone via google drive.

Once on my phone I use Phonto and Pixaloop to create animations. If it needs sound I rotate it to landscape and import it into iMovie to add music or sound. Export and then rotate back to portrait then upload it to byte. I usually do this the day after I upload my still images to Insta.

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I get my ideas from a list (that could last until the end of the time), or sleep (I always have wild dreams), or I talk to the ghost named Wankershim that resides in the walls of my room.

When I picked which idea to do, I’ll film (which takes about 30 minutes because I planned each shot beforehand) and then post. Only rarely do I ever edit because I want people to either see a raw reaction of me or I want them to see my foolishness.

I literally only film in the bed, so I can go back to sleep when I’m done.

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I think mine’s probably the most complex here :joy:.

First, I write down my ideas in my Notes app on my phone and somehow remember how they go in my head. Then, I record live-action footage on my iPhone camera and send that to my iMac. I then record voice lines for Lorelei and/or Tommy on my PC and send those to my iMac. I piece together and time everything right using Final Cut Pro X on my iMac. I then export the raw video file and convert it using Compressor to a file type that my PC can read. I then go back to my PC, open my video file in Blender, and render each individual frame of the live action video. Then I open a new file for animation and import the individual frames as my background for rendering. I then take care of all the animation. If I find I need to add a panel for chroma keying (aka green/blue screening), I then have to also render the live action frames AGAIN because of a filter that Blender uses to make the animation look better. Once the animation is all done, I render the frames, send them along with the filtered live action frames back to my iMac, piece them together in Final Cut Pro X, export the raw video file, convert it in Compressor, and send the finished product to my phone, which I typically upload the next day.

Told you it was long and complicated. :sweat_smile:

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Step 1: Idea generation
I rely mostly on passive creation. What I mean by this is that thankfully I accumulated a lot of ideas since vine was around, and now I don’t need to come up with things because I have a huge buffer. I can let the ideas show up. Either something inspires me, or I’m bantering with my friends/boyfriend and I realize it can be turned into a byte, etc…

Step 2: Improving the idea
The idea goes to the list, and then I really think it out. If I need to let it cook in the background for a week or two, no biggie. I’d rather have a better idea slowly, than a mediocre idea every day. I talk it out with my boyfriend, ask him for feedback. I come up with alternative versions, even if they are worse, to see if there’s a better way to present it.

Step 3: Recording
I record A BUNCH of takes of every single shot. Does it make the editing a nightmare? Yes. But do I prefer that to having a mediocre take and regretting it? Absolutely. (I’ve had 35 takes of one line or reaction, and I don’t reccomend getting to that extreme. I’m a perfectionist, I can’t help it. You can do better)

Step 4: Editing
I use premiere pro because it’s the software I already know how to use. Highly highgly reccomend to anyone who still has to learn that they look for something better. If I had to say what I think of Apple I’d be afraid of scarring someone with the amount of hate and aggresiveness.
Anyways, I get to see al the takes together and start eliminating them until I have the best few. Then I can mix and match to get to the best version of the byte.

Optional - Step 5: OMG what have I done
If I’m lucky, I am ready to post after Step 4. If I’m not, I realized while editing that either the joke, the camera angles and movements, or the delivery didn’t work as I thought it would. Maybe I needed one less second. Maybe I needed the joke to be structured differently. Whatever it is, I have to fix it. I go back to the idea list/recording and loose a couple days of work.

Hope this helps someone, but honestly, you are probably better off with your own method. I take so long to do a byte ya’ll, it’s a curse

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My creative process is spontaneous. However i feel at the moment is what gets recorded. I don’t pre plan unless its a collaboration. COMPLETE RANDOMNESS is what i strive for. I feel like it brings more authenticity and real energy to relate to then something that you know was scripted. Not hating on scripted bytes, i love all forms.

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Warning:

(Before reading my answer please view and like tons of Bytes from the people above me first).

stuseph… I went through your work after reading this. Nice work.

This is such a great question. (If I could give it 100x likes I would). Why? It does drive me batty that some of the work that takes me the longest does not get as many likes as things that take me less than 5 minutes. My Bytes are primarily are 1 of 100 ideas that blow through my mind every day.

I like all the creators that answered this question.

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I’ve got a couple of different processes, depending on what I am doing.

Animation:
Draw in Procreate using animation assist, export as a mp4, open in iMovie and edit, add sounds/music, upload to byte.

Time Lapse or Stop Motion:
Use the Byte camera, with Ghost mode on. open in iMovie and edit. Post on Byte.

Regular Videos:
Totally done in Byte for simple stuff. More complex stuff I edit in iMovie.

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I try my hardest not to actively pursue ideas. The harder I try, the more frustrated and discouraged I get because the ideas just don’t show up. So I try to go throughout my day just observing, staying as stress free as I can. My brain connects the dots way better that way.

If an idea does come up I don’t write it down unless it makes me laugh. If it doesn’t make me laugh, chances are it won’t do it for anyone else either. If I laugh, I write it down. Then I try to consider “How much work is this going to require?” A lot of the times my ideas are too complicated to work for a 6 second format. Simpler is always better, for me at least.

Filming varies from idea to idea. Sometimes I can shoot really quickly on my phone, other times I use my big fancy camera. Again, if it makes me laugh while shooting, I continue.

I upload the footage onto my Mac and edit in Final Cut. This takes anywhere from 20 minutes to a few hours, depending on the idea. Then I compress it to a phone-friendly format.

I’m my own worst critic. By the time a video is done I pretty much hate it. Showing it to different Byters that I trust for critique is such an important step and I recommend it to everyone.

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You can draw free hand with great skill. Impressive and rare. You seem to be a test case to see how you can take your drawing ability to make your animations better than the norm. I liked a ton of your Bytes before you posted here. Your work is great.

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I feel ya. My idea that I initially find funny isn’t funny to me anymore by the time I’m done with it. Fortunately I find that other people find it funny most of the time. :blush:

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I’m still fairly new to Byte but I’ve experienced similar “self loathing” by the time I’m ready to post something. I’ll end up hating it when it’s time to post but if it’s something I’ve invested time into then I’ll post it, see how others react and give it a 24 hour cycle. Generally, after about a day, and regardless of how many others like/comment on it, I’ll be glad I followed through.

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An idea hits me, I write it down. Next day I record it.
Done

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Similar to what Mike said; sometimes I get IB videos and build off from there. Usually, it takes me less than 30 - 60 sec to record and additional min to record. I don’t use any fancy software, camera, etc. (probably in the future, just waiting how far this app goes or growth). #ByteIt

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It varies. I write a lot of my ideas down into my notes, along with dialogue, props, ideas, or the tone that I want. I tend to sit on those for a while, thinking about them often/daily till I do it. These are often my favorite ones. I write down any idea whether it’s fully formed or not too, Bc sometimes it just takes a day away to figure out the right button (otherwise known as punchline) for the video. It’s satisfying to do it this way. I edit most of my videos on Videoshop.

Other ideas I have day of and depending on how I’m feeling I’ll do it.
Or how relevant they are. If they’re relevant I’m more inclined to do them that day.

Also sometimes I just get excited by something I find funny and do it right there. I’ll do it just Bc I’ll enjoy doing it.

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Basically im a college student so most of my ideas come from the weekdays like gaining inspiration from classes and daily student things. I write them down in my notes and have a rough script of how and what to film. Then on the weekends i film all the different bytes and i post from monday to friday so i film about 5 videos a weekend and more but yea.

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I try to post about once/twice a day. One thing is something I edited, and one thing is something just off the hip.

For editing, I have a list of general ideas I jot down on my iPhone, and once a week I try to edit everything in one sitting. Sometimes, it’s stuff I’ll shoot throughout the week…or a weird image I’ll capture and I’ll try to figure out the joke later. Other times, I’ll just shoot it in my living room.

I also been at twitter/facebook for a while and have this really, really long list of tweets that did well and sometimes when I’m super short on ideas, I dip into that well. Even if it’s not an apples-for-apples version of that tweet, I’ll just bounce off of that idea into something else. Or use the set-up with a different punchline.

I edit on Adobe Premire which is, very, very, very stupid.

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Also, I think good general advice I go by is that to try and think of one idea a day, no matter what or how bad it is. If you just jump in and go and ignore whatever it’s great or not, it gets your muscles moving and easier to think of good ideas. And a lot of times when you think you’re stumped and just poop one out, sometimes that is your (well, my) most popular stuff because it’s coming from an organic, real place.

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We make kid-friendly (for the most part) bytes, and most of them are cheesy dad jokes that I’ve heard over the years.

Hardest thing is take the dad jokes into a video formats and to get the lighting, timing, editing, and execution right. Sometimes it take a few hours but after a few hundred videos, I’ve learned to streamline the process.

But we started doing more comedy scripts as my daughter ages up and as our audience “grows” up along with us. The difficult part is to try different stuff and see if it works for our channel.

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