So if today's temperature is 0 degrees and tomorrow is going to be twice as cold, what tomorrows temperature will be?

I know its a weird question lol

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Exactly hehe

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Out of all the questions you could ask, why this? :joy:

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0 - 0 =0 wait what

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I’m curious lol

That’s why we have Google.

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Zero degrees what measurement

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Easy, we will skip tomorrow completely and pretend it doesn’t exist

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Im going with zero, but I’m not the best at math

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Did someone say a meteorological term?! :eyes::eyes::eyes: anyway, it’s simply math. It’ll still be zero degrees

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But what about the “twice as cold” part?

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Haha good idea

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Will it make any difference?

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Twice is just another way of saying “doubled” and last time I checked, 0 times 2 equals 0 :sunglasses:

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Then it means tomorrow is as cold as today?:joy: I’m confused

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It’s just worded that way to trip you up. Tomorrow will be as cold as today. Doubling zero will not increase the temp at all.

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Well if the temperature is 0 and you did not specify what type of temperature you are using, we have 2 options. 0 celsius is 32 fahrenheit, so if you meant celsius, double of 0 celsius is 64 fahrenheit which is 18 celsius. however if you meant fahrenheit, 0 fahrenheit is -18 celsius, thus if you double it it becomes 0 celsius. so in conclusion, if the question was in celsius, 0 doubled would be 18. If it was fahrenheit, 0 doubled would be 32.

BUT, the question said it gets COLDER, while both those temperatures became warmer by doubling them so the hidden answer is that is 0 degrees fahrenheit doubled is 0 degrees celsius. thus, 0 x 2 = 0

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Ah very smart Brennan :ok_hand: I believe it was in Fahrenheit but could be Celsius

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Aight so what is this in Kelvin?

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Absolute zero cannot be achieved, although it is possible to reach temperatures close to it through the use of cryocoolers, dilution refrigerators, and nuclear adiabatic demagnetization. The use of laser cooling has produced temperatures less than a billionth of a kelvin.

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