Is Byte Actually Next in Line to Blow? History/Trend Patterns Proves it Otherwise

Found another great article that was published by PHILLIP LEUNG

Article: Recent Rewinds: Unclear whether Vine’s successor Byte will have a lifespan as short as its videos

Timeline

Most of us are aware that history repeats and there are always new waves of trends that come and goes. It takes time for many to join the hype train and adapt to the trend. The article started off with a hook that captured my attention. It states “History repeats itself, and so does art. With films, video games and even books being flooded with sequels, remakes and spinoffs, audiences in recent years have appeared to embrace familiarity over novelty…” However, this is a classic saying we always hear or see, I actually agree.

Don’t want to spoil the rest of the article, I recommend checking it out. Worth the read, drop thoughts…

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Its kinda weird to make an article and chart comparing the lifespan of those apps when only 4 are shown. Granted it’s still in the early days of social media but idk if 4 apps are enough to show a common theme amongst the lifespan. I mean would the article say YouTube would’ve been as successful as Ebaums if it measured success and decline in its early years? :woozy_face:

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Whatever I do I always find a way for long term success rather than just a quick trend. In sports the patriots maintain long success, in videos YouTube has definetly maintained a logterm success etc. I prefer it that way because you actually live a legacy rather than a short moment or two.

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chart isn’t even to scale…

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What about comparing YouTube to dailymotion, vimeo, twitch, etc… Chart doesn’t aline

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Twitch came after YouTube. Thats why i used Ebaums as an example. If you compared YouTube in its early stages when Ebaums was a hit wouldn’t it be the exact same thing as they are comparing and youd assume YouTube would fail by it lol.

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I agree :star2:

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Hmm. This article seems to be giving a lot of leeway to TikTok, especially the part where they mention “Byte got 780,000 downloads in its first week…but TikTok had 8 million,” not even referencing anything to do with it being Musical.ly for 3-4 years before combining with the Chinese Superapp called Douyin.

Definitely lots of bias here. And the part where they said “the 250K partner pool is miniscule compared to the 170mil TikTok made…” yeah, well…the entire 250K is going to CREATORS, not the company. The rhetoric is trying to seem balanced, but it isn’t, despite its closing thesis.

Team Byte, everyone! :slight_smile: don’t let a Chinese datamining billionaire-funded censorship-based app change our views on our beloved Byte. We’ll move along, slowly but surely, whatnot with the Partner Program and the Beat Program in these coming months, as well as the anticipated merchandising and ad campaign.

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That would’ve been an interesting piece to compare or add. What about Facebook? :thinking:

That dig tho lol :joy:

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It’s bias and I’m glad that you read the article and critique it :ok_hand:t4::triumph:

Lovely essay as always and the grilling I like

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If you think it’s about what app or social media it is then you are missing my point. Not aimed at any platform but more the early days of these platforms.

Facebook was also after. But i guess that article is similar to comparing Facebook to Myspace which was before even twitter started. So not much like those 2 websites existed at all making comparing Facebook’s “future” the downfall of Myspace in 2004 is ridiculous when it’s such a brand new thing and social media is still very new that were not sure what way it’s going to go so how do you compare things in the early years. It’s too new to compare so why compare and predict the downfall. Trials and errors exist. :woman_shrugging:

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I get your point and do you have a valid point. facebook came after :thinking:

Thats literally what i just said. :woman_facepalming: you still keep missing my point.
Its not in the platform but basing the success off a style of certain platforms when we are still 20 years into the social media age is ridiculous.

Lmfaoo :joy:

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Interesting :face_with_monocle: :face_with_monocle::face_with_monocle:

Even though the title appears to be apocalyptic, I don’t think the article itself is as negative. It’s more presenting arguments about what might hold byte back, though I don’t agree with them. It tries making a point about how the 6 second format is outdated, citing both Instagram and Snapchat, however it doesn’t mention Vine actually got way more popular after IG introduced videos. Snapchat did end up taking away from Vine’s thunder towards the end of its lifespan, but again it doesn’t mention that Snapchat was literally buying out Vine creators to post exclusively on Snapchat.

It’s not if 6 seconds is a viable format, but how creators can be compensated. That’s ultimately what ended Vine. The only way Vine stars made money from their Vines was through ad based Vines, however these were for the most part, not well received from the fans. Twitter couldn’t figure a way to make money and for the creators to make money off of it, though this is a problem that YouTube also experienced.

YouTube wasn’t making money for a long time, as Google couldn’t figure out a way to properly profit from it. They even poured money into their creators for them to buy more professional equipment, to improve the quality of their videos. Even then it was still treading water for a while. And then it found its footing with the current Logan Paul style of vlogging. YouTube has basically taken over reality television. And I know @HenryAndEmma mentioned this a while back, but TikTok spent millions a day running ads (there wasn’t a day playing Piano Tiles that I didn’t see 20 TikTok ads).

Vine went through that same exact crisis of not knowing how to be able to profit from its own platform, but Twitter, instead of figuring out a way to make money off of it, gave up on Vine. So it’s not whether or not 6 seconds is a viable format, but if creators can be compensated for their work.

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Well said my friend

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Jesus :handshake::relieved:

I’ll need a popcorn for this

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I feel like anything can happen honestly, and it’s impossible to gauge social media’s because there’s so many variables. One thing is for sure though: dumping hundreds of millions of dollars can help and app grow.

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